Derma Roller For Stretch Marks

Using A Derma Roller For Stretch Marks
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Using A Derma Roller For Stretch Marks – Stretch marks are an inevitability for many of us and if you’re still looking for ways to reduce the appearance of yours, a derma roller may be the key. These rolling devices might be the missing piece of the puzzle for stretch marks, allowing you to roll your way to new skin that can reduce those unsightly scars.

Can you use a derma roller for stretch marks?

Derma Roller For Stretch Marks

Derma rollers can be effective tools to reduce the appearance of stretch marks, and with regular treatment, you can boost collagen and elastin production to fade them. While you can’t remove stretch marks entirely, using a combination of treatments might help you hide them better.

If you’ve got some scars that you want to tackle and happen to have a trusty derma roller in hand, we can help you make a difference. We’ll look at why the derma roller is so effective at treating stretch marks and the simple steps to take to treat yours.

What Is a Derma Roller?

Derma Roller

A derma roller is a skincare device that uses the process of micro-needling and collagen induction therapy. The derma roller is a small handheld device with a handle on one end and lots of small, sharp needles on the other, designed to roll over your skin and gently pierce the surface.

These skincare devices began as dermatologist tools but have become popular personal use products for home, often coming in a more compact design. As their key goal is to boost collagen production, they have become a useful tool against the signs of stretch marks, but should not be considered a miracle cure. 

How Does It Work?

The process of derma rolling is another form of collagen induction therapy which is the means of forcing the body to produce more collagen. It does this by piercing the skin and making tiny wounds, which your body then reacts to by boosting its elastic and collagen production to try and fix it.

The role of collagen within the human body is to hold together all of our connective tissues, including skin and bones, and it plays a huge role in many popular skincare treatments and products. By prompting your body to create more, you can renew your skin and regenerate cell growth, which means issues like stretch marks and acne scars become less prominent.

Can You Use a Derma Roller for Stretch Marks?

Our body starts to decline in its natural collagen production as we age, with experts stating that it decreases around one percent every year after we turn 20. Therefore, using tools like derma rollers can not only give our bodies a boost of the youth-giving protein to reduce the signs of aging but they can be used to smooth out stretch marks too.

Using a derma roller has been proven to effectively reduce their appearance thanks to the boost in collagen production, but you have to know how to do it right. Although a minimally invasive procedure with no downtime, you do need to have the right size needle and the right approach to see results.

As always, when targeting stretch marks, you’re going to get the best results when the marks are new, which means the scars will likely be red or purple in color. During this stage, they’ll be more susceptible to change, and treating them with things like a derma roller will yield the best results.

Of course, there’s no cure-all for purple stretch marks, and even with regular treatment, there will still be some form of them on your skin. However, with the right approach, you can lighten the color of them and smooth out the texture of the scarring so that they’re a lot less obvious on your skin.

Stretch Marks Before & After Using A Derma Roller

Choosing the Right Derma Roller

The size and quality of the derma roller you use will have the biggest impact on your success at reducing stretch marks so you want to get it right. Derma rollers come in different sizes relating to the length of the needle, and depending on the skin concern you’re targeting, there are recommended sizes that suit best.

For stretch marks, experts recommend using a 1.5mm to 2.0mm needle as this allows to get deep enough into the skin’s surface. However, derma rollers with needles around the 2.0mm mark aren’t recommended for home use, so you may need to seek help from a dermatologist if you plan on going this size.

In contrast, something finer like wrinkles only requires a 0.5mm needle, so you can’t expect the same results using one size over your entire body. A derma roller for stretch marks needs to be long enough to reach the scar tissue that has formed, otherwise you won’t see any major results.

Just as important as the size of the needle length is their sharpness and regardless of what you’re using a roller for, they should always be sharp and sterile. You’ll want to replace the roller every 10 to 15 uses to ensure it’s sharp enough to pierce the skin safely and always disinfect the device before you get started.

A Simple Routine for Rolling Stretch Marks

Using a derma roller to get rid of your stretch marks requires patience and consistent treatment, but the results are worth it. With a derma roller in hand and a clear vision about where you want to target, this is the routine you need to follow to reduce the appearance of your unsightly marks.

  1. Clean the roller

The roller must be sterilized before every use, so soak it in a 70 percent isopropyl alcohol solution for 10 minutes before you begin. Dry the roller with a clean towel after sterilizing it.

  1. Wash the area

Cleanse the area you plan on targeting with the roller using mild soap and water. If you’re rolling your face, you can use your regular cleanser before beginning. Wipe the area with the isopropyl alcohol after you’ve cleansed it. Dry off the area before commencing.

  1. Apply a numbing cream

If you’re concerned about how the roller might feel, you can apply a numbing cream to the area. Most people find rolling to be tolerable and barely noticeable but you can use a numbing solution if you want to. Give it time to take effect before starting, and wipe the cream off completely.

  1. Apply hydrating serum

Use a hydrating serum that contains a product like hyaluronic acid and lather it onto the area you’ll be rolling. This will keep your skin soft and moisturized during the process and help to speed up results.

  1. Roll the stretch marks

Start in one direction and roll six to eight times, lifting the roller up and off the skin after each pass. Swap directions and areas and repeat the same steps. Continue the process again so you’ve rolled every area twice.

  1. Apply more serum

When you’re done, apply another generous coat of the hydrating serum that you used before you began.

If you’re able to commit to a full month of rolling your stretch marks with three sessions per week, you should start to notice results. However, if you have concerns that you’re damaging the skin, stop immediately, and if you feel that your stretch marks are beyond home remedies, seek out the advice of a dermatologist.

Roll Away Your Worries

A derma roller can be used for so many skincare concerns, and with a little bit of persistence, you can even put them to work on your stretch marks. Although you’ll never rid yourself of them completely, lessening their appearance can help you to love your body a little more.

Related Questions

Derma rollers have become major players in many people’s home skincare routines, but there’s a lot to learn before you jump in and start rolling. We’ve answered a few FAQs about these rollers that will give you the lowdown first.

Can You Use a Derma Roller Too Much?

Yes, it is possible to use a derma roller too much and damage your skin without getting any of the benefits. Depending on the size of the needles in your roller, the recommended usage is between two and three times a week, but sometimes once is enough if you’re using it with a quality serum.

What Happens If You Derma Roll Too Much?

Overusing a derma roller can lead to permanent scarring of the skin which can also darken it. Those with sensitive skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis should avoid using a derma roller at all unless they’ve been given the all-clear from a dermatologist to do so safely.  

When Should I Replace My Derma Roller?

A derma roller needs the needles to be as sharp as possible for results so you should replace them after 10 to 15 uses. If you use it a couple of times a week, this means once every month the head of your roller should be replaced.

Resources

https://www.healthline.com/health/beauty-skin-care/dermarolling-how-it-works-before-and-after

https://www.byrdie.com/dermaroller-for-stretch-marks